Antibacterial resistance – Superbugs could kill every 3 seconds by 2050

This serious threat is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. - Word Health Organization

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If you still do not know what is superbugs, you need to read this right now. Antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon that cannot be stopped by modern science. By the arrangement of nature, over time, bacteria change to ensure their survival and adapt to the drugs that are designed to kill them. Such bacteria, known as superbugs make previously standard treatments for bacterial infections increasingly ineffective. In layman’s language, when an antibiotic medicine is administered to cure a particular illness, over a period of time the bacteria which caused that disease and were killed by the antibiotic drug become stronger than the antibiotic. This forces the physician to prescribe stronger antibiotics. Gradually this reaches a stage when the bacteria becomes more powerful than any antibiotics available in the market. Such bacteria are called superbugs.

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A report petitioned by British government states that superbugs could kill every 3 seconds by 2050 if medical industry and government agencies do not take the threat posed by superbugs with utmost seriousness.

Antibiotics should only be used when prescribed by health professionals. Unfortunately health professionals themselves are not well equipped with adequate knowledge of how to prescribe antibiotics. it is said that the physician should closely adhere to the five rights of drug administration: the right patient, the right drug, the right dose, the right route, and the right time.

“A World Health Organization (WHO) report released April 2014 stated, “this serious threat is no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. Antibiotic resistance—when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work in people who need them to treat infections—is now a major threat to public health.” Increasing public calls for global collective action to address the threat include proposals for international treaties on antimicrobial resistance. Worldwide antibiotic resistance is not fully mapped, but poorer countries with weak healthcare systems are more affected.” (Source Wikipedia.org)

Examples of drug-resistant bacteria, or superbugs are: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA), extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MRAB).

Review on Antibacterial Resistance had to say this:

The real implications of spreading drug resistance will be felt the world over, with developing countries and large emerging nations bearing the brunt of this problem. Routine surgeries and minor infections will become life-threatening once again and the hard-won victories against infectious diseases of the last fifty years will be jeopardized. Hospital stays and expenses, for both public health care providers and for out of –pocket payers will increase significantly. Drug resistant infections are already on the rise with numbers suggesting that up to 50,000 lives are lost each year to antibiotic-resistant infections in Europe and the US alone. Globally, at least 700,000 die each year of drug resistance in illnesses such as bacterial infections, malaria, HIV/Aids or tuberculosis.

If we fail to act, we are looking at an almost unthinkable scenario where antibiotics no longer work and we are cast back into the dark ages of medicine. – David Cameron, UK Prime Minister

The Review on AMR has been assessing solutions to avoid these terrible costs, producing thematic papers looking at all aspects of the problems raised by drug resistance – including the supply of new drugs, the use of diagnostics, surveillance, infection control, alternative treatments and the use of antibiotics in agriculture. These themes will form the basis of the final report to the UK Prime Minister, with recommendations for global solutions, by the summer of 2016.

We have reached a critical point and must act now on a global scale to slow down antimicrobial resistance” – Professor Dame Sally Davies, UK Chief Medical Officer

NEW – January 21, 2016. Major declaration by pharmaceutical industry on combating antimicrobial resistance launched to coincide with World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos.

May 19, 2016 – Tackling Drug-Resistant Infections Globally: final report and recommendations

This report outlines the Review’s final recommendations. It first discusses the mounting problem of resistance and why action is needed to combat it and then provides an overview of the solutions that the Review thinks should be implemented to curtail unnecessary use and increase the supply of new antimicrobials. It then looks at the role of public awareness campaigns, the need to improve sanitation and hygiene, reduce pollution from agriculture and the environment, improve global surveillance, introduce rapid diagnostics and vaccines, the need to increase the number of people in this area, and use of market entry rewards and an innovation fund to generate more drugs. Finally the paper examines how these solutions can be funded and looks at ways to build political consensus around them.

Take a look at some of the latest reports from across the world:

Unaddressed, superbugs could kill ‘every 3 seconds’ by 2050, report suggests – Fox News

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2016/05/19/unaddressed-superbugs-could-kill-every-3-seconds-by-2050-report-suggests.htmlThe latest edition of an annual report petitioned by the British government suggests that by 2050, superbugs will kill someone worldwide every three seconds if policy makers and advocacy groups don’t take action, the BBC reported. Superbugs, or …CBS NewsArs TechnicaVICE News – Unaddressed, superbugs could kill ‘every 3 seconds’ by 2050, report suggests – Fox News

Action needed to curb misuse of antibiotics that creates superbugs – South China Morning Post

http://www.scmp.com/comment/letters/article/1948650/action-needed-curb-misuse-antibiotics-creates-superbugsIn 2014, the reported that in 2013, every 18 minutes, a new patient was found to be infected by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (also known as superbugs) in Hong Kong public hospitals, for which the therapeutic options were limited.Irish IndependentAllAfrica.comFinancial Express Action needed to curb misuse of antibiotics that creates superbugs – South China Morning Post

World must act now to fight the spread of superbugs – South China Morning Post

http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/1948897/world-must-act-now-fight-spread-superbugsLast month, a European conference of microbiologists was told that a newly discovered antibiotic-resistant gene capable of transferring easily between bacteria, a key element in the emergence of new superbugs, has been found living in the gut of … World must act now to fight the spread of superbugs – South China Morning Post

Superbugs will kill 10 million a year by 2050 – FierceHealthcare

We are headed into the dark ages as the world will be over populated by 2050 putting a strain on the food supply and the earth. But, there is hope as we go into the future. Superbugs, like Ebola, Malaria, C-diff, MRSA, and E. Coli will kill 10 million … Superbugs will kill 10 million a year by 2050 – FierceHealthcare

How big a threat are superbugs? – BBC News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-36334299A major review of resistance to antibiotics has warned that by 2050, superbugs could kill one person every three seconds across the world unless urgent action is taken. The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, started in mid-2014, calls for a public … How big a threat are superbugs? – BBC News

Fortunately, Ayurvedic herbs and medicines, if prescribed by experienced physicians, are able to fight any so-called superbugs naturally.