Know Microsoft’s brand new browser: Edge

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There may be people who like to use Internet Explorer but there certainly are many who just can’t stand IE no matter which version it is.  Here is an interesting news for them from Microsoft. Internet Explorer’s more modern and fast successor, previously code-named Project Spartan, is now Edge, and one of its most notable new features is extensions. Perhaps Edge’s greatest asset is that it’s not Internet Explorer, which, even after lots of improvements in speed and tightened design, was one of the most reviled pieces of software in history.

6 Reasons to Try Microsoft’s Edge Browser | PCMag.com

w=600&r=3Among the many fascinating reveals in the opening keynote of the Microsoft Build 2015 developer conference—Android and iOS code running on Windows phones, holograms that can attach themselves to physical robots, and Visual Studio for Mac and Linux—was the Microsoft Edge browser.

Perhaps Edge’s greatest asset is that it’s not Internet Explorer, which, even after lots of improvements in speed and tightened design, was one of the most reviled pieces of software in history. Though Edge’s icon still sports an “E,” it really isn’t IE. Even underneath, it runs a new page-rendering engine called…wait for it—Edge. Yes, that was the name of Project Spartan’s engine, and it has now been elevated to the full product name. It tops IE’s longtime Trident engine in speed and compatibility with new Web standards such as HTML5. 6 Reasons to Try Microsoft’s Edge Browser | PCMag.com

Microsoft Edge browser won’t pick up Extension support until after RTM | Windows Central

w=600&r=3Microsoft has a lot on their plate this year with Windows 10, Phone, Surface, Cortana, and more. One of those to-do items to finish is the new Microsoft Edge Browser, formerly known as Project Spartan. The browser is coming along nicely, but like many things on Microsoft’s roadmap, there is still much more to come. In a deep dive session this evening on Microsoft Edge, Microsoft’s Charles Morris, and Sean Lyndersay discussed a few aspects of the new browser, including extensions and when they are coming.

Unfortunately, extensions will not make it into the RTM build of Microsoft Edge, due sometime “this summer” (yes, they are still sticking to that timeframe). After Edge ships, Microsoft will continue to iterate upon Edge through updates in the Windows Insider program. Once feedback has been received, and the new feature is ready, it will ship to Windows 10 through an in-Store update to users.

Although it is unfortunate that extensions are still months away, the good news is that we are getting them. More importantly, developers can simply recompile them with a few tweaks. This feature means your favorite Chrome or Firefox extension stands a very high chance of being part of the Microsoft Edge experience. Microsoft Edge browser won’t pick up Extension support until after RTM | Windows Central